Help: I Don’t Like Fruits and Veggies!

I had a great question from one of my readers recently, and wanted to share the answer with everyone:

The question is about trying to lose weight when you don’t like fruits and vegetables, and live with someone who often cooks unhealthy meals.

How to eat a healthy diet

One of the most important things you can do, when trying to eat healthier, is to make small changes, which you can stick with. So, rather than trying to change everything at once, take it step by step, accomplishing one or two goals at a time.

Something you may want to try is Goal Setting, as this is an excellent way to focus your mind on what you want to achieve. To get started try using my Goal Setting Chart, to record a few goals which are important to you right now.

Guidelines for daily healthy eating:

  • Plenty of fruit and vegetables (aim for 1-2 portions of fruit, and 3-4 portions of vegetables)
  • Plenty of bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods – choose wholegrain varieties whenever you can (5 portions)
  • Some milk and dairy foods (2-3 portions)
  • Some meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein (2-3 portions)
  • Just a small amount of foods and drinks high in fat and/or sugar (0-3 portions)

To find out more, check out my Series on Balanced Nutrition.

What to do if you dislike fruits and vegetables

For those who dislike most fruits and vegetables, unfortunately there is no magic pill which can take their place. Eating a variety of different coloured fruits and vegetables is essential when it comes to achieving optimum health. Without adequate intake we put our bodies at risk for certain diseases, illnesses, and possibly even vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

1) Go with what you have initially

If you already enjoy eating particular fruits and vegetables, this a good starting point. My advice would be to regularly serve the vegetables and fruits which you enjoy, and then try to increase the variety of your intake little by little. It’s important to try out new varieties as often as you can – there really are so many to choose from, you’re sure to find something you enjoy!

2) Try out new methods:

Remember, that some vegetables can be disguised in meals -

  • Grate carrots or zuccini into curries or stews.
  • Mash white beans into minced beef.
  • Blend vegetables and add to pasta sauce.

Experiment with different styles of cooking -

  • BBQ, or roasted vegetables taste very different to boiled, or steamed vegetables.
  • Try eating your vegetables raw for extra variety, and crunch.
  • For quick cooking options, vegetables can be microwaved in a little water.

If fresh fruits and vegetables are too expensive -

  • Opt for those that are in season, as they tend to be cheaper.
  • Have a selection of frozen and canned (choose low salt/sugar versions) vegetable options, as these are also acceptable.
  • Keep a supply of frozen and canned (in natural juices) fruit for quick and easy desserts, or snacks.

Mealtimes –

  • For lunch always try to have a salad with, or in, your sandwich, for example dark green lettuce, peppers, tomatoes, onion, cucumbers, and grated carrot etc.
  • Take care with sauces, dressings, and other condiments etc as they tend to be either high in fat, sugar, and salt, or a combination of all three. Try flavouring your foods with herbs, spices, olive oil, lemon juice etc.
  • For dinner try adding some mixed vegetables (fresh or frozen) to noodles/potatoes/pasta/rice dishes, and serve along with lean meat, beans, or egg dishes etc.
  • Ultimately the responsibility lies with you as to what you put into your body. Therefore, if unhealthy foods are served, choose for example to eat chicken and vegetables, and opt not to have the French fries. If you still feel hungry have a slice of wholegrain bread, and a piece of fruit afterwards.
  • Check out my article, A Visual View of Serving Sizes Using Everyday Items, to learn about portion sizing.

Eat well at work to help you reach your fruit and veggie portions:

  • Have a piece of fruit, or fruit salad, on hand for an easy mid-morning snack
  • Prepare sliced raw vegetables, as a mid-afternoon snack.
Click the next page to read more great advice if you don’t like fruit and vegetables and want to lose weight…
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About Melanie
Melanie is a Registered Dietitian who started Dietriffic in March 2007. Her aim is to make good health attainable and sustainable, without guilt and torture, making her approach popular with those who desire a level-headed approach to good health. Have you got your copy of her free book yet?


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{ 57 comments… read them below or add one }

David February 18, 2008 at 12:43 am

Anyone interested in getting kids to develop a friendly attitude towards fruits and vegetables should take a look at new book called “The ABC’s of Fruits and Vegetables and Beyond.” Great for kids of all ages – children even learn their alphabet through produce poems. It is coauthored by best-selling food writer David Goldbeck and Jim Henson writer Steve Charney. You can learn more at HealthyHighawys.com

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Nico February 18, 2008 at 7:32 am

I think these tips are very valuable.

I have an overweight friend who wants to lose weight but has a hard time achieving this because everbody in his environment keeps eating unhealthy stuff.

He does efforts to eat healthy, by eating salmon, for example, only to be mixed with cocktail sauce in the same amount as there was salmon. Horror!

Food awareness, social and psychological factors are indeed very important and are often overseen when planning a diet program.

Very coincidentally I talked about this topic on my blog as well. Not in a way as comprehensive as you did here, though.

Great post

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Melanie February 21, 2008 at 3:44 pm

Hi David,

Thanks for recommending the book, I haven’t come across that one. This is actually a topic I discussed briefly in, 5 Ways to Help Kids Eat Veggies , and would really be interested in checking out the book.

Hi Nico – Thanks for your positive feedback!

You are absolutely right, social and psychological factors are so important. Often people don’t understand why they can’t lose weight, when in actual fact if they had a strong support network surrounding them, half the battle would be won! It’s sad that some families and friends aren’t more supportive.

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IAAdmin February 22, 2008 at 8:22 am

Great article with great ideas. I get my strength training at home with hand weights, lunges, and squats.

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Ready Maid February 22, 2008 at 12:29 pm

What a great site! Just ran across it from Blog Explosion. Will keep coming back.

Thanks for a great post, too.

Reply

Melanie February 22, 2008 at 1:20 pm

Hi IA,

Thanks for your positive comments. Strength training really is so important, and so convenient if you can do it at home.

Hi Ready Maid,

Thanks for visiting, and I hope you will keep coming back in the future. Big thanks for the sidebar link to my site as well!! :-)

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brittany July 18, 2008 at 3:56 am

so for the people who dislike fruits and vegetables, you’re pretty much saying we’re screwed and just to work out more?

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Melanie July 18, 2008 at 9:57 am

Hi Brittany,

No, that is the complete opposite of what I said.

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Denise August 27, 2008 at 6:36 am

Fruits are disgusting. Thankfully, I like just about all vegetables.

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Melanie August 27, 2008 at 3:25 pm

Hi Denise,

I’m sorry to hear that you don’t enjoy fruit – do you drink fruit juice? What about smoothies? Or have you tried dried fruit?

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Lydia December 1, 2008 at 12:42 am

I have not liked fruit since i was about 5, but i really want to give it ago and start eating it again. My mum is trying to persuade me to try some, and i do try it, but i just dont like it. I don’t like smoothies either or yougurts with bits in. I really wish i did like fruit!!!!!!!!!! Please help me!!!!!!!! Lydia,aged 11

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Melanie December 2, 2008 at 5:35 pm

Hey Lydia,

Thanks for contacting me.

Have you tried looking up recipes online, or borrowing a fun cookbook from the library? This can be a great way to experiment. Could you try out a recipe for healthy muffins with different types of fruit, such as berries, or pineapple added. Cooking is a great way to begin enjoying all kinds of different foods.

Do you try out new fruits often? Perhaps you have been sticking with the same ones – there is so much variety and choice out there, why not try out one new fruit each week until you find some that you do like?

It’s also about thinking WHY you are eating them, ie “they’re good for me!” I used to hate Brussels sprouts when I was a kid…I wouldn’t exactly say I love them, but I can tolerate them, because I know they’re good for me!

Let me know how you get on!!

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Diane Roberson March 4, 2009 at 9:06 am

I’m over 65 and love all veggies but hate most fruits. I like bananas and smoothies that have berries, pineapple and peaches are improved with cottage cheese but I don’t like lowfat cottage cheese and I’m not allowed to eat fat. Pieces of fruit in yogurt is nasty. Maybe if one could puree the oranges, pineapples and other nasty fruit and put them in yogurt or fruit sauce. Fruit sauce over a low fat cake might help the tastebuds a little. Heating would destroy the nutrients so maybe a sauce made by using the blender instead of the stove. Is that possible? Do smoothies and blended fruits lack fiber? It is the strong taste of fruit that makes my taste buds unhappy and my face twist and pucker up with disgust. Help!!!

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Melanie March 4, 2009 at 8:55 pm

Hi Diane,
Do you try new fruits regularly? I think this is important to help expand your tastebuds. Perhaps eating them frozen would be more acceptable? Berries, grapes and mango are good frozen!

The whole fruit would obviously be better. When you blend fruit it breaks it down, although it will contain some fibre. If you do blend your fruit, make sure you don’t eat too much, because it would be very easy to eat more than normal (and not benefit so much from the fibre) so you get a sugar high.

I don’t think you need to worry too much though. If you are eating plenty of veggies, you will be getting lots of nutrients. However, you should try to eat a good range of different foods each day, including some fruit!

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Stacey March 9, 2009 at 12:58 am

Hiya,

Im 18 years old and would really like to loose weight, but the things is that wen i was a baby till i was about 12 the only thing i would eat would be bread and cheese everything else i would throw back up. But for the past 6 years i have ate so much more different food, i now eat chicken and pasta. I used to be very skinny and have a poor diet to the point i didnt have any fingernails.

Over the pass 3 years iv put on alot of weight and would really like to loose a couple of stones. I cant eat fruit or veg beaucse they make me feel sick and i dont know if thats beacuse i was bad when i was young and was force fed stuff and given really bad milkshakes.

I have tried deit and they one last a couple of weeks. I try and doo as much exercise as i can, i cycle and i walk every where, but its the food i eat that leting me down.

I would really like some advise to get me over this, beacuse i really do wnna start eating healthy and start loosing weight. Can you help me ?

Stacey

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Melanie March 11, 2009 at 6:57 pm

Hi Stacey,
Have you signed up for my free ebook and newsletters? I think this would be useful, because each week or couple of weeks you’ll get an email from me on how to lead a healthier lifestyle. You can check it out here: http://www.dietriffic.com/2008/10/14/the-lifestyle-makeover-guide/

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Jamie March 26, 2009 at 4:57 am

I’ve been trying to eat healthier, but I hate veggies. Every time I try to eat a salad (or anything green for that matter) I gag. I love fruit, but I know I need to be eating veggies. I don’t understand why my body reacts the way it does to vegetables. I can drink V8 Fusion, but will that cut it? Also, do you have any suggestions?

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Melanie March 27, 2009 at 12:18 am

Hi Jamie,
How often do you try to eat these foods? Is there a particular reason, perhaps from your childhood, as to why you hate greens so much?

What happens when you eat other vegetables, such as carrots, cauliflower, or turnip?

To be honest, you really should get most of your veggies from fresh produce, so the V8 just won’t cut it.

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Dr. Tammy Connlin January 5, 2012 at 8:50 pm

I had to respond to this. As a family practice physician, I was discouraged to read that you told someone that something such V8 would not be an acceptable alternative to eating limited or no vegetables at all. Although high in sodium (and they do now often a low sodium version) , V8 when consumed within its expiration date and as part of a healthy diet and knowing to limit sodium elsewhere…..V8 is most certainty a valid choice should one find themselves unable to consume vegetables any other way. You would have been best served to caution against sodium but to approve V8 even perhaps a low sodium one and also to recommend a homemade version that could be made with fresh produce.

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Melanie January 10, 2012 at 9:00 pm

Tammy,
I was trying to get to the bottom of the problem concerning veg eating. I merely cautioned against relying on V8 fusion solely. As a general practice I don’t recommend juice drinks. V8 fusion is a fruit and veg drink. I prefer whole, fresh foods, where possible. Obviously, if juice is the only thing someone can tolerate, it’s better than nothing. That is what I was trying to find out by asking a few other questions.

I take your point about recommending a homemade version, however.

Fresh V8-Style Juice Recipe

3 large tomatoes
3 stalks celery
5 carrots
1 small beet
1/4 head fresh cabbage
1 red bell pepper
2 cups spinach
2 kale leaves
1/4 sweet onion
1/2 clove garlic (optional)

Simply pop into a juicer, then enjoy!

Makes about 5 cups.

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Crystal May 15, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Try the new Hide-A-Veg, from the Lynn Zetta Company. We’ve been using it for a few months now and it is AWESOME! It’s a dietary supplement of real vegetables that is added striaght to our food “like salt or pepper”! I’ve even snuck it in the kids PB&J and they have NO IDEA they are eating beets and spinach!

I have slowly begun to tell them about the veggie content, and after several tantrums they have started learning that vegetables don’t have to taste bad. It’s the first step. They are not ready yet- more more open to the idea of eating fresh veggies now. :)

It couldn’t hurt and I have snuck it into EVERYTHING! Even Chocolate Chip cookies!

lynnzetta . com

Good luck!

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Melanie May 18, 2009 at 9:21 pm

Hi Crystal,
Thank you for telling me about the Hide-a-veg product, I hadn’t heard of it and I am certainly intrigued.

I think it’s also good that you are also trying to integrate more fresh produce into your children’s diet too, very important for future years.

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gypsy June 12, 2009 at 5:12 pm

Hi my name is gypsy and i have a problem with my husband: He doesnt like vegetables. He always tells me that if I make them taste good he’ll eat them, but they taste good to me but not to him. Do you have any recipe book you may recommend me to making vegetables taste good. I was raised eating veggies but his diet has mostly consisted of meat and starchy foods.

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Melanie June 13, 2009 at 8:08 pm

Hi Gypsy,
Have you tried cooking them in different ways? For example BBQ-ing or roasting, rather than boiling or steaming your vegetables? Raw veggies also taste very different to cooked, so may be more acceptable to your husband. Perhaps adding different herbs, spices or citrus fruits to them??

Here’s an article you may find helpful: http://www.neversaydiet.com/slideshow/5-most-hated-fruits-amp-veggies-made-tasty

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Fiona July 25, 2009 at 7:01 am

I have a really hard time with most veggies and many fruits because of their textures. Even if the taste is bad, I can force myself to eat just about anything, but the natural textures of a lot of produce just seem to bother me to the point of gagging. :( I have recently tried to branch out a little to the point where now I like a lot more fruits (apples, bananas, mangoes, cantaloupe, peaches), and veggies like potatoes and mushrooms, but I can’t stomach leafy greens, peas, beans, almost anything green, crunchy or chewy really, to the point where I can’t even handle lettuce or tomato in my sandwiches. I also can’t stand the texture of berries or the crunchiness of watermelon. For some reason these things just don’t register with my body as “food,” and I feel like I’m eating a blade of grass or something. Even though I have a thin frame, I would really like to eat more healthily, but most people don’t seem to be very helpful. Everyone downs salads like they’re eating the most normal thing in the world, and I wish I could eat them so easily too!

One thing is for sure, I am going to make certain that when I have kids they eat healthy from birth and don’t dodge their veggies.

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Melanie July 25, 2009 at 7:33 pm

Hi Fiona,
It sounds tough…although the fact that you try to “branch out” is good. I suppose the only thing you can do is keep trying.

How do you feel about fruit and vegetable smoothies or fresh juice?

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quietgirl97 April 11, 2010 at 9:29 pm

i don’t like fruits and vegatables at all so what can i do to be more healthier

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Cameron April 15, 2010 at 1:26 am

I can’t say I’ve found anything useful here.

There are some people, myself included who cannot eat fruits or vegetables. I’m not speaking of a dislike, i’m speaking of a physical intolerance.

Your advice, taken from both your article and your comments is to either grow up and eat it anyway, disguise the food, hide it, cook it differently or sign up for your ebook or newsletter.

None of these options offer the slightest help, so…

What would be your advice for these people? Accept your fat fate?

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Melanie April 15, 2010 at 7:01 am

Cameron,
Are you talking about oral allergy syndrome (OAS)?

I think it’s obvious, this article was not aimed as such a condition, the question from my reader was about not “liking” fruit and vegetables — in this case, gradually learning to enjoy fruits and vegetables is important for long-term health. It’s not about growing up as you put it, you are taking me out of context there.

As far as an intolerance is concerned, that’s a completely different ball game. If you can give me a little more info, I’ll certainly write an article on it.

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Reality Check July 21, 2010 at 9:37 pm

Hi, I’m like Cameron (above). I cannot eat (digest) vegetables. It has nothing to do with the texture or taste. I can disguise them in any form. Within 15-20 minutes of eating them, I get a severe pain in my stomach and have to run to the bathroom where they are passed out in recognizable form. I do not gag or vomit so I don’t think it is my mind.

This has been going on for many decades and as I get older (past 60), I am trying to eat more vegetables but I am really sick of this. I might add that I am also lactose intolerant and, along with that, I get sick from eating eggs or drinking tea or coffee. This leaves me with a very restricted diet.

In my research I cannot find any real answers other that to try to introduce vegetables slowly (does not work) or to take some pills (not acceptable). I shoud note that it seems to run in my father’s family and they live hale and hearty until past their mid 80′s despite not eating a vegetable.

I wonder if you have any suggestions. It really bothers me when I travel or go out to eat.

Thanks for any help.

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N3312 October 19, 2010 at 7:23 pm

I no longer can eat fruit or veggies. I have glucose intolerance, which has become so bad I just gave up the 30 grams of grapefruit I was eating with my last meal of the day. I had to give up cabbage also, it turns out all veggies have more sugar than most people realize. My blood sugar spikes into the beta cell damage zone with fruit and veggies. Oatmeal might have to be phased out real soon. I am also close to starvation – I struggle to maintain 114 at 5′ 8″. I’ve been drinking soymilk to stay alive, but it’s low in fiber and seems to be destabilizing my sugar levels. Normal people can get away with fruit and veggies, I can’t. I thought I was sick, so I started testing with a glucose meter, and sadly, the results are very bad – diabetic after certain meals and pre-diabetic fasting blood glucose. To make matters worse, I can’t chew well and with no real vitamin C anymore, what teeth I have left may be gone. All my food must be processed and has been for several years, which complicates the matter further. I have so many issues compounding this nutrition issuse, which I won’t discuus, but if my nutrition goes, suicide is the only answer left. I will continue to trust God and check my meter each morning. Now I’m very afraid of scurvy. I don’t have much faith in my supposedly natural vitamin C pill.

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Andy March 28, 2011 at 4:10 pm

Hi. I am trying to lose some weight but i deslike majority of vegetables. Everytime i try anything i end up physically sick. I am fine with any fruits.

How can i have a health diet withought veggies? Is there an alternative

Thanks.

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Melanie April 8, 2011 at 9:02 am

Hi Andy,
Does this happen even if you mix the veg in with other items, for example grated carrot added into a curry or stew?

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abby August 3, 2011 at 3:53 am

Hi, I’m in my late teens and have never liked fruits or vegetables. The taste of most fruits I find repulsive, and while i dont mind the taste of some vegetables, i find myself unable to swallow them without gagging. It is the same case for fruit and vegetable drinks. I’m wondering if maybe it’s because I have always thought of them as disgusting that I have this problem of not being able to eat them. I would be thankful of any help you could give me. Thanks.

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Willy August 6, 2011 at 11:48 pm

Im 17 years old weight about 135-140 and absolutly hate vegetables i love Fruits(even though im allergic to most). i Put in a fair amount of time in exercising everyday and eat pretty well(not vegetables). But now im a bit overweight and gained alot more fat. Last year i went from 172 to 120 in about two months through out the school year i gained 10-15 pounds which to me is alot. Is there really any substitute for vegetables? or something that’ll keep me healthy as in no fat and just vitamins and etc? so that my metabolism can catch up and burn the fat.

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Melanie August 8, 2011 at 6:58 pm

Hi Willy,
Unfortunately, I can’t say that there is a substitute. Have you tried to eat some of your vegetables raw? Broccoli and cauliflower, for example, are pretty good that way. What about vegetables that are mixed in without other ingredients, for example curries or stews? Can you eat them like that?

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anne August 8, 2011 at 6:59 am

hi ! i don’t often eat veggies. what vitamins should i need to take to support all the nutrients in my body. thanks :)

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Melanie August 8, 2011 at 7:02 pm

Hi Anne,
Vegetables really are the best option for your nutrients. But, if you know you are not eating enough, try taking a multivitamin which doesn’t contain more than 100% of the RDA/ RNI for each nutrient.

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Johnny Adidas October 15, 2011 at 4:10 pm

Hi Melanie,

Yeah I’m in that group who doesn’t like fruits or vegetables. I like the idea of blending them in other things you like, I might try that.

What about getting them through drinks, like V8? I can manage the small cans because I can down them fast. Would that work?

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Melanie October 20, 2011 at 8:11 am

Hi Johnny,
The V8 drinks would be an option, yes, but I’m not sure of the other ingredients added to those. Perhaps you could check out the label yourself next time you purchase one. Sometimes these drinks are loaded with unhealthy ingredients, too. Another option is to buy a juicer and make your own veg juice. That would really be the best case scenario.

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Johnny October 21, 2011 at 3:32 pm

Thanks Melanie. I’ll check it out. At least V8 is something I guess (veggies in my system).

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Gaby December 1, 2011 at 12:34 am

Hi, I’d like to say that I don’t eat fruits or vegetables, sadly…I wish I did, but I just don’t like them. One time, I tried an apple, by force, but I just ended up hating it more. I really disliked it. The only thing that comes close to fruits or vegetables that I eat is probably sancocho. Its Dominican and has a lot of healthy stuff in it. But its not like I eat it everyday. Anyways, I’d like some advice on this. I’m 16 and getting a little fat on my stomach from no exercise. And I don’t like that either. I’m very inactive, so what do I do? :(

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Melanie December 2, 2011 at 10:43 am

Hi Gaby, what happens when you drink apple juice, for example? Can’t you eat veg added in with other foods? For example, chicken curry with vegetables?

If you are inactive you really need to work on a regular exercise routine. That is important for your health right now and in the future. There’s no quick fix for this, you just need to do it. Here’s an article on getting started with a regular exercise routine. You have youth on your side, but you need to make the effort now.

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Dani February 19, 2012 at 4:11 am

Help husbanhas new onset of type 2 diabetes. He will not eat veggies and never seems to like what I make. I need help planning meals and feeding this man. I love him dearly and want to get this under control.

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kayleigh May 23, 2012 at 10:32 pm

Hi Melanie.
I really dont know what to do now, I have tried eating healthily but I hate so called healthy foods. I physically cant eat fruit, veg or salad, I dont even like pasta. These foods make me sick and I struggle with different textures even if I dont mind the taste. I really want to lose a couple of stone and I work out on a regular basis but it does nothing for my weight, all I really eat is meat, potatoes and bread ! Is there anything you could suggest that will help me.
Thanks
Kayleigh

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Melanie May 31, 2012 at 9:22 am

Hi Kayleigh,
Have you tried juicing fruits and veg or making green smoothies? That’s a good way to get lots of veg and fruit packed into your diet. You could have something like that for breakfast or as a snack.

Reply

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danni November 7, 2012 at 12:39 pm

hi i absolutely hate vegetables and salad but really want to loose weight without veg or salad any way doin this?

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Melanie November 16, 2012 at 1:52 pm

Hi Danni, You need veg and salad in your diet for general health, not just weight loss. Veg and fruits really are the most nutritious foods. Lean proteins are also important when you are trying to lose weight. And, sticking with a diet that avoids heavily processed foods like white bread, pasta, and packaged foods.

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Terry Simpson December 6, 2012 at 9:50 am

Thanks for the advice regarding dieting when one dislikes fruits and vegetables. Now, how about some advice regarding exercising when one has a chronic broken vertebra in one’s back (repaired with a rod and several screws), neuropathy in one’s feet and hands, and a severe case of COP (not COPD, but COP – Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia). The neuropathy is not caused by diabetes, but by a pinched nerve in my spine that my neurologist and neurosurgeon disagree on (neurologist says it’s caused by my surgery, neurosurgeon says not so). I can’t walk because of my feet, my back, and my lungs; I can’t hold onto weights with my hands. Should I stick to water exercises? I can’t do aerobics, but I might be able to do stretching exercises.

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Melanie December 6, 2012 at 12:12 pm

Hi Terry, have you been advised that water exercises are okay for your condition?

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Terry Simpson December 7, 2012 at 8:13 am

No – I haven’t asked. Didn’t even think about the possibility til I was writing that last message. I’m seeing my doctor in two weeks, though, and I’ll ask him if water exercises are okay. Thanks!

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Jonny July 18, 2013 at 8:59 pm

I am 20 years old and do not eat fruit or veg at all, the last time i tried i gagged and threw up. i am getting a little overweight now and i want to get back in shape doing exercise and stuff but i think i need to cut down on the stuff i am eating, also it is really uncomfortable for me whenever i go out for a meal with friends because i can hardly eat anything forcing us to wander around for half an hour before we find something i can eat. its really bad because i cant even eat chips because of the potato content. I do drink fruit juices but not the ones with pips in as it makes me gag and throw up. Is there something i can do to make my diet healthier without adding in fruit and veg like portion sizes the type of carbohydrate and protein i eat?

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bob feens August 17, 2013 at 12:47 am

What a great site! Just ran across it fromDerekSemmler.com. Will keep coming back.

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Dapo November 11, 2013 at 3:54 pm

Hi Melanie,

thank you for your article,

I am 29yrs and I dont take fruits since i was about 12yrs old. When i take a bite, I must have some type of mint with me, because i immediately get irritated. I take the mint to stop the urge to vommit. Please what can I do. I know fruits are really good for me and I really want to start taking fruits. What can I do?

Dapo.

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